FAQ

Welcome!

Join the email list here


Are prices for a single item or a set?

All prices are per single item. Our knives are made in USA from premium virgin steel.


When will my order ship?

Each product page displays a ready-to-ship date. Orders are assigned a scheduled ship date, which is shown at every stage of the checkout process and on the order confirmation email. Tracking emails are sent on the scheduled ship date.


Do you have a physical storefront? Is there a distributor of Flying Steel knives near me?

This website is the only place to purchase new Flying Steel gear.


Do you ship to my country? What is the shipping fee?

We are located in the USA. We ship worldwide. Shipping is flat-rate – $10 to the US, $30 to Canada, and $50 everywhere else. See shipping and ordering for more details.


What knives do you recommend?

We are known for making the best no-spin throwing knives in the world, and generally the knives in our current offering are the knives that are considered the most popular by our customers. The buyer is encouraged to read about the various styles of no-spin knife throwing and select one style that is appealing. The throwing style will determine the ideal knife length and balance, and a suitable knife can then be selected. Most of our knives are 10 to 11 inches long because this size is compatible with most no-spin throwing styles.


Can you (or I) sharpen the edges of a Flying Steel knife?

Flying Steel knives are made to withstand the abusive nature of knife throwing. The steel hardness and bevel grind angle are optimized for maximum toughness and safety rather than slicing or edge-holding ability. We do not offer sharp edges. See use and care info for more details.


What should I use as a target?

End-grain soft wood makes the best target. Log slices (also known as log rounds) are cheap and easy if you have access to them, but are prone to splitting. Block targets are better because they allow for maintenance and restoration, but they are heavy and laborious to make.

Face-grain soft wood is also good, and a panel made from wood boards is perfect as a backdrop or support for an end-grain target.

Plywood and hard wood (e.g. oak, maple) should be avoided.

Knifethrowing.info has a lot of information on targets. This vid shows how to build a face-grain target. Vids that show how to make a block target can be seen here, here, and here.